The Protégé Effect: How You Can Learn by Teaching Others

The Protégé Effect: How You Can Learn Better by Teaching Others

 

The protégé effect is a psychological phenomenon where teaching, preparing to teach, or pretending to teach information to others helps a person learn that information. For example, a student who is preparing for an exam could benefit from the protégé effect and improve their understanding of the material by helping explain it to their peers.

The protégé effect can be highly beneficial in a variety of context. As such, in the following article you will learn more about this effect, and about how you can take advantage of it as effectively as possible.

 

Examples of how you can use the protégé effect

The protégé effect is primarily associated with the academic context, where the act of teaching others can help you learn material that you need to learn yourself. However, the protégé effect can also benefit you in a variety of other situations. For example:

  • When it comes to hobbies, teaching related skills to novices can help you master those skills yourself.
  • When it comes to work, explaining important procedures to new employees can help you understand those procedures better yourself.
  • When it comes to general knowledge, explaining concepts that you’re interested in to people who aren’t familiar with them can help you remember those concepts better.

 

How the protégé effect helps you learn

The protégé effect helps you learn information better as a result of several mechanisms, all of which revolve around the differences between how we learn information when we’re learning for ourself, compared to how we learn it when we expect to teach others, as well as when we teach them in practice. Specifically:

 

The benefits of teaching others

As we saw above, teaching others facilitates your own ability to learn the material. Accordingly, students who learn the material with the intention of teaching it later, perform better when tested on that material than those who learn it just for themselves. Furthermore, such benefits are not limited to academic settings, as studies show that preparing to teach can also improve motor learning and enhance information processing when learning how to perform a physical task, such as how to hit the ball in golf.

In addition, there are other benefits to teaching others, beyond the direct improvement in ability to learn the material. Such benefits include, for example, improved communication skills, increased confidence, and improved leadership ability. Moreover, note that the increased motivation to learn which occurs as a result of preparing to teach is viewed now only as a mechanism through which the protégé effect facilitates learning, but also well as a direct benefit of preparing to teach.

Finally, another benefit worth mentioning, which applies in cases where peers teach one another, is the fact that peer-teaching is also highly-helpful to the students being taught, since they often learn better when their teacher is someone that they are close to in terms of social and cognitive distance.

Note: some studies suggest that the fact that older siblings tend to have a higher IQ than their younger siblings can be attributed to the fact that the older siblings act as tutors in the family, at an age when they undergo significant cognitive development. This represents an example of the powerful influence of the protégé effect, and of its long-term benefits.

 

How to take advantage of the protégé effect

There are three main ways in which you can take advantage of the protégé effect to enhance your learning process:

  • Learn the material as if you are going to teach it to others. This involves studying the material as if you were going to teach it to someone else later. For example, this could entail learning the material well enough that you would feel comfortable explaining it to others later, and finding the answers to likely questions that people might have on the topic. To encourage yourself to do this properly, you can imagine yourself teaching the material to someone later, which could help boost your motivation, while also improving your ability to predict what you will have to do as part of the teaching process.
  • Pretend that you’re teaching the material to someone. This involves pretending to explain the material to someone else. The more realistic this will feel, the more you will benefit from the protégé effect, so it can be worthwhile to do this aloud, and to put effort into visualizing the interaction between you and the people you’re pretending to teach.
  • Teach the material to other people in reality. This involves actually meeting other people and teaching them, either one-on-one or in a group setting. Though this approach takes the most effort, it can also lead to the greatest benefits, especially since knowing that you’re actually going to teach someone will likely provide you with the greatest boost to your motivation.

You can use any combination of these techniques that you want. For example, you might learn the material as if you were going to teach it to others and then pretend that you’re teaching it to someone, or you might skip directly to teaching the material to other people in reality.

When deciding which techniques to use, assess the potential benefits of each, and then weigh them against the potential costs involved, in terms of factors such as time and effort.

Specifically, while teaching someone in reality will often allow you to benefit the most from the protégé effect, this method generally entails much more secondary costs than the other approaches, in terms of factors such as the time it takes to schedule teaching time with others. On the other hand, learning the material as if you’re going to teach someone and pretending to teach someone are both slightly less effective methods, but are generally much easier and more convenient to set up.

Which methods you should use will depend on factors such as your personal circumstances, preferences, and goals.

For example, if you really enjoy teaching others, or if you have an upcoming exam where it’s crucial to get a high score and you have a lot of free time, meeting with someone in order to teach them might be the best course of action. Conversely, if you dislike teaching, or if you have an exam which isn’t important to you and you’re also short in time, you will likely be better off just learning the material as if you’re going to teach it or pretending to teach it to someone, rather than teaching it to someone in reality.

 

Summary and conclusions

  • The protégé effect is a psychological phenomenon where teaching, preparing to teach, or pretending to teach information to others helps a person learn that information.
  • The protégé effect improves your learning process by increasing your metacognitive processing, increasing your use of effective learning strategies, increasing your motivation to learn the material, and increasing your feelings of competence and autonomy.
  • Beyond improving your ability to learn the material, teaching others can also lead to additional benefits, such as improved communication skills, increased confidence, and improved leadership ability.
  • To take advantage of the protégé effect, you can learn the material as if you are going to teach it, pretend to teach it to someone, or teach it to other people in reality.
  • When deciding which approaches to use in order to benefit from the protégé effect, remember that the more realistic the teaching feels, the more you will benefit from it, but that any potential benefits must be weighed against potential costs, in terms of factors such as time and effort.